Summer Evening, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

summer-evening-hopper

Summer Evening, Robert A. Sieczkiewicz
Dog days of summer they are called often.
Closeness not something really wanted.
Carnal love easy to be forgotten,
As for budding romance to be daunted.
Shall we let our love take a vacation,
Or are we missing a point of import?
Our relations is in termination.
If this be not true what do we purport?
You know just as I that this should not end.
Then it is we who must the puzzle solve.
If differences we cannot suspend,
This relationship will now be dissolved.
Difficult times such as these hearts get crushed,
As a spent cigarette then away brushed.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

This painting, Summer Evening, was painted Edward Hopper in 1947.  World War II was over and America’s economy was confused, moving from a war economy to a peace economy.  Lives were thrown in to chaos.  Loving relationships were tested.

Chaos in human life could be the trademark of the Trashcan School to which Hopper was grouped into.  However, he never accepted belonging to the group.  He did paint what the members of the group did paint, everyday life.  He did however, more than the others shows a pessimistic attitude in most of his painting.  Of all the Ashcan School Hopper put the least content in his painting but gives us the most to think about.  Of course that is my opinion.

 

 

 

 

 

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bobsieczkiewicz

Husband, Father, Grandfather, Lover of all beautiful things. I love to read and write poetry. My favorite hangouts are libraries and museums and yet I love being outdoors. I am a dreamer of things that could be.

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