Dreaming Man, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

Man SleepingThe Sleeping Man, Carolus Duran (1861)

Dreaming Man

The warm dusk embraced them, they dine and dance
Soon darkness took them under her soft wing
Strolling hand in hand, the start of romance
In the other’s loving smile was basking

Neither to be the first to say good night
Both know their evening has come to an end
They were only one step from out of sight
A red rose to him did she quickly send

He breathed in the rose then gave it a kiss
Studying its petals he’s in a trance
Now fully in the loving state of bliss
With heavy eyes gave the rose one last glance

She is the only one he will adore
His dream ruined by a knock on the door

 

Winsome Gardner, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

Winsome Gardner

Woman Drying Herself, Edgar Degas (c. 1894)

Winsome Gardener, Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

From the look of thy dirty clothes and skin
Is apparent where thou have lately been
Toil not in thy garden plot forever
Even though it may provide great pleasure
Take to thy bath and quietly recline
Shall be joined with favorite glass of wine
Let thoughts flow ever slowly through thy mind
Leaving thy many aches and pains behind

Water hot, soft spa cloth upon thy face
Dream of flowers thy garden which they grace
Breathe in the essence of thy handmade soap
Knowing thy effort shall give others hope
Towel gives comfort to a tired body
Thinking of the long day finally done
Thee many holes dug and countless weeds pulled
Cannot remember last when had such fun

 

Reading, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

ReadingReading, Leopold Franz Kowalsky (c. 1900)

Reading

My way to you is a carpet of green
You upon it making my view serene
A gentle face greets me that is pristine
That is the most beautiful to be seen

Parting pages, returning to your book
Taking on a pretending childish look
Pure as the water of a babbling brook
This hankering heart you easily shook

Studying you intently, I respire
Each passing moment increasing desire
Your sudden attention I now require
Without your tenderness I’ll soon expire

On the lush green grass we now softly roll
An undying love for you I extol

 

Castles of Sand, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

Castles of SandCastles of Sand, William Henry Margetson (1898)

Castles of Sand, Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

Walking to the seashore this cloudless day
Capturing warm white sand between my toes
Coming to hear what the waves have to say
Feeling salty scents that the south wind blows

Desiring of day dreaming sat me down
Casting my eyes over this vast domain
Being a new queen awaiting her crown
Wishing to provide a long love filled reign

Moving the sand, building a great castle
Towering rooms for my many children
Showing castle anything but banal
Missing yet is the most important one

Finding a king to help me I shall pray
Knowing tides will take this dream away

 

Demophoön and Phyllis, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

Tree of Forgiveness

The Tree of Forgiveness, Edward Burne-Jones (1882)

Demophoön and Phyllis, Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

Pledged to return as thee sailed with the wind
Daily watch the tides waiting thy return
My love for thee promised not to rescind
A lonely heart for thy caress does yearn

Now a hemlock brew do I quickly drink
To rid my heart of a tremendous pain
No mental strength to balance on the brink
Chain I cut, yet love of thee will remain

Have taken pity for my foolish deed
The Gods have now returned me as a tree
It is with your touch that I shall be freed
To again give unfettered love to thee

Fear not confusing words, caress me now
To seal our love expressed in earnest vow

 

Autumn Leaves, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

Autumn LeavesAutumn Leaves, John Everett Millais (1856)

Autumn Leaves

Autumn a time of change and gathering
When the days are warm and the nights have bite
The sun’s bright time with us now lessening
And feathered sometime friends are taking flight

Time for gathering shaded fallen leaves
An attempt to make the fields appear clean
Huddling around the pyre everyone grieves
Praying that their souls shall now be pristine

Persephone ate pomegranate seeds
Now into the great darkness she descends
So will all not accounting for misdeeds
No better time than now to make amends

Autumn we move into the barns our wealth
And time to consider our moral health

 

Morning Kiss, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

The Morning KissRomeo and Juliet, Frank Dicksee (1884)

Morning Kiss

Each morning I climb a dangerous vine
In search of the fair maiden Juliet
Her sweet kiss is my daring aim to get
A sign our hearts continue to align
That forever her love is only mine
Lovers joined our hungry lips do we set
The dangers of this kiss does she opine

My Love is no choice for us to linger
Though I sorrow each moment we’re apart
Hold me for a second more then must go
Dare not be caught within my bed chamber
Cold steel surely would meet your heated heart
Together we will die my Romeo