Thirsting, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

ThirstingBoy with Pitcher, Edouard Manet (1872)


In my body a desire to express
If left undone surely I will explode
Is your great beauty eager to possess
It is in my heart shall be your abode

To hold you intimately in my hands
Drinking of your young love with eagerness
With every sip my love for you expands
Oh to fully bathe in your tenderness

Your skin softer than the world’s finest silk
Touching mine makes me want you even more
This feeling of love for you will not wilt
As I never felt this anguish before

Quietly we can go to river’s edge
There together shall take the lover’s pledge


It is You, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

It is YouBerthe Morisot, Edouard Manet (1869)

It is You

Why is it that love has become a chore
It is you I give myself evermore
It is you only that I do adore
It is you I could not love any more

It is you who truly make my life bright
It is you I desire to hold so tight
It is you I want always in my sight
It is you I hunger for every night

It is you who now give an awful fright
It is you who I fear may soon take flight
It is you whose heart I must reignite
It is you my loving heart that I plight

If it be that your love I can’t restore
Shall quickly quit this life forevermore

The Sleepwalker, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

The SleepwalkerThe Sleepwalker, Maximillian Pirner (1878)

The Sleepwalker

A love to steal, who she thinks is real
Pondering over him both day and night
Her deep anguish she attempts to conceal
Searching the darkness without any fright

In the secret of her mind he’s divine
She claims his perfect love never to spurn
Eager to have their hot bodies entwine
Before daylight she finds a safe return

She knows one day of finding her lover
That she would soon share the warmth of his bed
Then one deep dark night she did discover
The exact place where he did lay his head

On the narrow ledge, not taking a breath
Wind came along, now falling to her death

From the Sea, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

From the SeaThe Birth of Venus, Sandro Botticelli (c. 1485)

From the Sea

Light, bright as the sun falls into the sea
Forcing thousands of ripples to the shore
Disrupting the quietness quite pertly
Curious bubbling foam each ripple wore

Substance steadily stacks at water’s edge
When suddenly a wind came roaring in
Whirling all if it were a swirling dredge
Ceasing abruptly as it did begin

Then suddenly before my very eyes
Slowly grains of sand falling to the ground
The remaining form much to my surprise
I stood their helplessly without a sound

Such great beauty in her pure nakedness
Was the goddess of all beauty, Venus


Yes or No, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

Yes or NoYes or No, Edmund Blair Leighton (1890)

Yes or No

With a feeling bluer than my nosegay
Worrisome heart in doubt, life uncertain
Still not knowing what exactly to say
Is today to be the final curtain

He claims an undying love ever true
Is there a chance his love to go a stray
But he gave a feeling I never knew
Feeling continues till this very day

Is confusion of mind, love that I feel
Thought love to be much joy and happiness
Not an aching heart, a painful ordeal
Yet such warm comfort from his gentleness

Yes or no, somehow I must now decide
Shall it be goodbye or become his bride


Vivien and Merlin, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

Viviane et MerlinVivien and Merlin, Gaston Bussiere (c. 1900)

Vivien and Merlin

Vivien, thou to be my lasting fate
To control me until the end of time
Bold beauty surely not thy greatest trait
Skillful deceit to capture heart of mine

I’m old and thee be precious spring flower
Before me thy sweet scent meant my descent
Easily thee my heart fully devour
For I did willingly give my consent

Every moment together causing strain
Knew thou desire a secret to attain
It’s about the power thou wish to gain
While I exhaustively tried to complain

Oak tree which shielded us during the storm
Soon bed to be for heavy need of sleep
Will forever encase me in its form
Vivien, more misery thy shall sweep


Fire of Desire, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz


Fire of DesireChez le Pere Lathuille, Edouard Manet (1878)

Fire of Desire

Would have preferred giving another rose
Not of yellow but of the brightest red
Symbol of what my heart really shows
To speak softly words I have never said

With little effort my heart you did steal
Excitement you created from the start
A feeling inside that is so real
To carry great love for you in my heart

Pray that there is no need to hesitate
To shower you with my eager passion
I am burning with love and cannot wait
Compressed within more heat than any sun

This inferno your beauty did ignite
Will consume me to wait another night