Sweet Idleness, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

Toulmouche Auguste-Dolce far niente (1877)

Auguste Toulmouche, Dolce far niente (1877)

 

Sweet Idleness, Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

Sweet idleness helps to improve my mind.
To read of others in their endeavor,
Of love, seeking two hearts to be entwined.
While I’m safe without fear of displeasure.

Tales of woe often fall on my deaf ears,
Of the flagrant straying of a lover.
None to date has yet to bring me to tears.
A small smile as my heart does not suffer.

Am I the fool for keeping my heart closed?
To having lived the feeling of heartache?
To live with tragedy with heart exposed?
To be captured by an ev’r charming rake?

None do I find the least bit amusing,
Nor the thought of me, a love pursuing.

The Dawn of Love, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

Brooks, Thomas, 1818-1892; The Dawn of Love

Thomas Brooks, The Dawn of Love (1846)

 

The Dawn of Love, Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

Sitting peacefully here with you so near,
I gaze upon your virginal beauty,
Wondering if this feeling I should fear.
Has Cupid done his appointed duty?

What is it about you that gives such joy?
Be it the sound of your voice makes me meek?
Making my heart dance as a little boy.
Is it your love I unknowingly seek?

Your bluest eyes brighter than any sky,
Their twinkling puts this poor mind in a trance,
Making every thought of you start to fly.
But are we too young to think of romance?

Be sure that this heart has an open door,
With you it be love, willing to explore.

The Stepping Stones, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

z-Brooks Thomas, The Steppig Stones (c. 1880)

Thomas Brooks, The Stepping Stones (c. 1880)

 

The Stepping Stones, Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

Life, a real challenge at any age,
Even more so, for one as young as you.
There is no safety, if locked in a cage,
It will be wisdom that will guide you through.

Each stone before you is a test in life,
Focus on the stone which lies before you.
Have sound footing to avoid any rife,
For each stone forward make your step be true.

Be fair warned of a wavering heart,
As it can confuse a serious mind,
Bewildering all thinking from the start.
You must be forewarned that all love is blind.

Endearing as it is, may seal your fate,
Now hurry, he waits at the garden gate.

Rain and Wind, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

z-Knight Daniel Ridgway - Gust of Wind

Daniel Ridgway Knight, Coup de vent (c. 1900)

 

Rain and Wind, Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

Love the rain, for it makes the air so sweet.
Its tap on my umbrella is asking,
To come in, that we would formally meet,
And upon my face it would be basking.

But the angry wind, I do not care for,
Shoving, to where it chooses me to go.
I am glad when in sight of the front door,
Buffeted once more if I am too slow.

Inside I hear the patter of the rain,
Each drop searching for a way to sneak in.
Tired, I see it slide down the window pane.
The winds howls telling me that it will win.

I dare not ask that the wind to abstain,
As it pushes the clouds that carry rain.

Beached Love, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

Krøyer P.S.-Summer_evening_on_Skagen's_Beach._Anna_Ancher_and_Marie_Krøyer_walking_together._-_Google_Art_Project

P.S. Krøyer – Summer evening on Skagen’s Beach (1893)

Beached Love, Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

The blue calmness of the water moves her,
To reverie in her heart’s deepest pit.
Empty it is, that echoes does she hear,
Drowning deeper than willing to admit.

Loss so great it causes her to tremble,
For she does not know any reason why,
But to her love it is surely baneful,
Feeling the pain a tear she did not cry.

Pain would be slight had not been so happy,
With dreams of many years to spend with him,
Planning of the day when they would be three,
At this present moment her life bedim.

Can this love die of a natural cause?
To this burning question she does give pause.

A Kiss of Love or Desire

z-the kiss

Ambrogio-Antonio Alciati, Le Baiser (c. 1910)

 

A Kiss of Love or Desire, Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

I’m a volcano ready to erupt!
Not sure, be it love or be it desire.
Surely, one leads to heaven one the fire.
Suddenly into my heart you irrupt,
Such a feeling you shall not interrupt.
For it is your love I wish to acquire,
And the very least to evoke your ire.
I plead that you not leave this heart bankrupt.

Oh it is you who are the biggest fool,
You failed to read the love signs sent.
Ignorance treats this heart so cruel,
Now we are so close show me your intent.
Be it your choice ov’r my heart you may rule,
And into heaven we shall both ascent.

Come with Me, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

Asher_Brown_Durand_-_Landscape,_Scene_from_-Thanatopsis-

Asher Brown Durand, Scene from “Thanatopsis” (1850)

 

Come with Me, Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

Come with me, we shall extol His goodness.
Look at the world He has placed before us,
A plenty before us in this vastness.
Let’s sing our song of thanks so boisterous.

We shall take to our knees to give Him praise,
First be of His gift of our many days,
Then in how He provides in many ways,
And how He has stripped us from our malaise.

This land given with His heavenly grace,
Never be thought to be a just reward,
For we are just His tenants in this place,
As it is heaven we’re working toward.

Let eternal faith in Him be our guide,
Until the day we cross the great divide.