Windflowers, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

WindflowersWindflowers, John William Waterhouse (1902)


Thou garner my flowers then dash away,
Thy beauty is much greater than their sum.
Alluring garden would be if thou stay,
Just remain ‘til thee be final blossom.

Sent the wind to touch your ivory skin.
Purer than that of newborn mother’s milk,
Protecting thy beauty which burns within.
Come stay awhile so I may touch thy silk.

Do sense a hesitation in thy pace,
Thy action causes heartbeat to increase.
Turn so I may see thy beautiful face,
This feeling of love for thee shall not cease.

Let me braid my flowers into thy hair,
And I shall give my heart to thee to wear.


The Rose, a Poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

The RoseThe Rose, Frederic Soulacroix, (n.d.)

The Rose

‘Tis my wanting heart I have sent thy way
Being fragile needing thy tender care
Between thy breasts for safety it must stay
No thorns are present to give thee a scare

Sorry that the token rose having tossed
Errantly missing its intended mark
Hope this not an omen to be star-crossed
As wishes in my heart to increase this spark

But why the sadden look upon thy face
Thine eyes are missing their usual glow
If thou wear a smile isn’t in the right place
Is something in thy heart I need to know

Thy quick response surely unsuspected
For it is woeful to be rejected


Unexpected Love, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

Unexpected LoveWoman Fastening Her Garter, Edouard Manet (1879)

Unexpected Love

In a cold darkened world of loneliness
Two bodies unexpectedly collide
Each searching for a special happiness
Both with different lives they wish to hide

Man and woman in need of the same thing
The warm gentle caress of human touch
No sign of untanned lines of wedding rings
Soon they’re within each other’s hungry clutch

Neither one at all fond of keeping score
Finding changes in their deepest feelings
Suddenly realizing they want more
The sharing joys that being in love brings

Neither asking questions the other’s past
Too busy ensuring that love will last


Thirsting, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

ThirstingBoy with Pitcher, Edouard Manet (1872)


In my body a desire to express
If left undone surely I will explode
Is your great beauty eager to possess
It is in my heart shall be your abode

To hold you intimately in my hands
Drinking of your young love with eagerness
With every sip my love for you expands
Oh to fully bathe in your tenderness

Your skin softer than the world’s finest silk
Touching mine makes me want you even more
This feeling of love for you will not wilt
As I never felt this anguish before

Quietly we can go to river’s edge
There together shall take the lover’s pledge


It is You, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

It is YouBerthe Morisot, Edouard Manet (1869)

It is You

Why is it that love has become a chore
It is you I give myself evermore
It is you only that I do adore
It is you I could not love any more

It is you who truly make my life bright
It is you I desire to hold so tight
It is you I want always in my sight
It is you I hunger for every night

It is you who now give an awful fright
It is you who I fear may soon take flight
It is you whose heart I must reignite
It is you my loving heart that I plight

If it be that your love I can’t restore
Shall quickly quit this life forevermore

The Sleepwalker, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

The SleepwalkerThe Sleepwalker, Maximillian Pirner (1878)

The Sleepwalker

A love to steal, who she thinks is real
Pondering over him both day and night
Her deep anguish she attempts to conceal
Searching the darkness without any fright

In the secret of her mind he’s divine
She claims his perfect love never to spurn
Eager to have their hot bodies entwine
Before daylight she finds a safe return

She knows one day of finding her lover
That she would soon share the warmth of his bed
Then one deep dark night she did discover
The exact place where he did lay his head

On the narrow ledge, not taking a breath
Wind came along, now falling to her death

Vivien and Merlin, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

Viviane et MerlinVivien and Merlin, Gaston Bussiere (c. 1900)

Vivien and Merlin

Vivien, thou to be my lasting fate
To control me until the end of time
Bold beauty surely not thy greatest trait
Skillful deceit to capture heart of mine

I’m old and thee be precious spring flower
Before me thy sweet scent meant my descent
Easily thee my heart fully devour
For I did willingly give my consent

Every moment together causing strain
Knew thou desire a secret to attain
It’s about the power thou wish to gain
While I exhaustively tried to complain

Oak tree which shielded us during the storm
Soon bed to be for heavy need of sleep
Will forever encase me in its form
Vivien, more misery thy shall sweep