The Brooch, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

The BroochThe Brooch, Edvard Munch (1903)

The Brooch

A gift for you I wish to find
One that is beautiful as you are.
But I could travel around the earth
And only have what is second best.
No diamond could have a sparkle
Of that which is in your eyes.
No ruby of the deepest red
A match for the color of your lips.
No karat gold to be so pure
Of the love that you provide.
Yet a selection I must make
As a symbol of my undying love.
You to wear close to your heart,
For that is the place I want to be.

Early Morning’s Dew, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

Early Morning's Dew

Early Morning’s Dew

Providing jewels to all with its touch
To be seen but dangerous to disrupt
Like the butterfly fears a human clutch
Even by a heavy breath they erupt

Looking at a red rose outside my door
Are they diamonds or pearls on each petal
Getting closer in order to be sure
Never to know for not being agile

Light as possible I walk on the grass
Looking back now seeing but my green tracks
Jewels gone without sound of broken glass
To me is very strange how each reacts

After a single step I am frozen
By a silk threaded jeweled chandelier
Below a tree branch so perfectly spun
With bright jewels more than days in a year

The sun made them twinkle before my eyes
Cannot believe such a majestic sight
Each jewel being of consistent size
Now begins to tremble from the sun’s light

Slowly each jewel turns into a tear
Quietly falling to the earth below
The once beautiful chandelier is clear
With deep regrets it’s the end of the show

 

First Jewels, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

First JewelsLes Premiers Bijoux, William-Adolphe Bouguereau (1891)

First Jewels

On the wings of a downy summer wind
A vision of heaven stood before me
Feeling as if to a tree I was pinned
Wondering if this could really be

If be with body put thy hand in mine
Her velvety softness now I did feel
She spoke to me in a voice so benign
Her mission was my empty heart to steal

Moving close to her my breath couldn’t expel
Her lips start in my heart a raging fire
‘Cause of her beauty I am under a spell
Now filled with uncontrollable desire

Without wealth what gift can I give to thee
I give my heart and the fruit of the cheery tree

 

Woman in the Garden, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

Woman in the GardenMujer en el jardín, Pierre-Auguste Renior (1872)

Woman in the Garden

Emeralds, Sapphires, Topazes, Rubies
Filling my garden this sunny June day
Come walk, feeling the gentle warming breeze
See bees here and there dancing their ballet

Stop to wonder a greater sight to see
Profusion of color before my eyes
Drinking without pause all of its beauty
All on display under a clear blue sky

No need for the gardens of Babylon
Or Cimetière du Père Lachaise
Forget manicured gardens of Fairlawn
For me to be, there is no other place

Each little gem I consider a friend
This is where I shall my many hours spend

 

Jewels on the Hutchinson River, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

Johnson David-Scene on the Hutchinson River 1876

Jewels on the Hutchinson River, Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

Waters so still reflects what life to be.
Neither harsh nor soft but ever changing.
Come sit with me each day and thou shall see,
Experience beauty, lives exchanging.

Here today the water is filled with gold.
Soon it will give way to a silent gray,
Thin arms shaking if of the very old
Stay longer and watch a skating ballet.

The earliest spring mists will thwart our view,
Now water salted with rubies and more,
As trees prepare for a different hue.
We now see emeralds from shore to shore.

Look you can see the jewels everywhere
But not of the kind you are apt to wear.
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Here I have given the poem a different name from the painting, changing only the first word.  The Scene on the Hutchinson River was painted in 1876 by David Johnson.  He was a member of the Hudson River School and he was best known for the development of Luminism which is an American landscape painting style of the 1850s to the  1870s, characterized by effects of light in landscapes. Luminist landscapes focus on tranquility, and frequently display calm, reflective water and a soft, hazy sky.  For my poem I have focused on the reflective water.

If you were to ask many people living in the North East why they live there a common answer to be that they like the change of seasons.  The speaker in the poem is one of them.