Golden Leaves, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

The AvenueThe Avenue, Claude Monet (1878)

Golden Leaves

Whispering autumn wind came rolling in
Sending shivers to every golden leaf
Many of them beginning downward spin
Without displaying any sign of grief

The remainder held on with a belief
They have value and should somehow survive
Not falling to what they think is a thief
With power as to who remains alive

But are they some sort of romantic fools
Blinded by confusing view what is life
Distorting the basics of nature’s rules
Resisting can only create more strife

Trees stand naked, the golden leaves are gone
All now beneath the snow, none left to mourn

 

Final Request, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

Final RequestOld History, Alexander Jakesch, (1892)

Final Request

In the slender box it is dark as coal
No longer the touch of a loving kiss
All that remains is a wondering soul
Of a body who some surely to miss

Why intense sadness in your beating hearts
Bringing some to their shaking weakened knees
Is it special forgiveness it imparts
Or support for your self-indulgent pleas

When I’m finally gone please do not mourn
Just know that I have loved ever dearly
Let your weeping heart not be deeply torn
My request is that you take it boldly

Let there be great joy that our lives did cross
Think my life a treasure, not as a loss

 

The Candle, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

Woman with a Taper, Jules Breton 1873Woman with Taper, Jules Breton (1873)

The Candle

Candle’s glow let forever to be your guide
Making sure its bright flame never to quit
The wind’s access must always be denied
Wind is evil, tempting you to submit

Might your candle’s glow suddenly disappear
Do not place it in a darkened drawer
For your future will then become nadir
Must make an effort its flame to restore

Surround yourself with those whom you think dear
Be not afraid to share what is you fear
If true to yourself future will be clear
The glow of the flame you now will restore

Light of the candle to you be sacred
Then drink of His wine and eat of His bread

 

 

Nana, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

NanaNana, Edouard Manet (1877)

Book by Emile Zola

Nana

You have the power to control the sun
There’s not a man who your beauty would shun
A magnetic allure second to none
The world’s most desirable courtesan

Not very long ago you walked the street
Elevated to stage door men you’d greet
Now many men lay prostrate at your feet
Creating dreams for fools by your deceit

Do wonder what it is you have inside
Some darkened secret of the past you hide
Never thinking to be a loving bride
Surely absent is a life filled with pride

Easily shared your body not amour
You do know you are but a high priced whore

 

Suicide, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

SuicideLe Suicide, Edouard Manet (1877)

Suicide

Is true to what I have really done
Desire to rid myself of misery
Lying here still bleeding holding a gun
In death thinking I’d be totally free

There is torture in the time that remains
Bed continues to hold her luscious scent
My sick heart shackled in her mighty chains
Absent her savage kiss I now lament

I’m afraid now to close these heavy eyes
In her full beauty she shall reappear
Knowing she is the devil in disguise
To guide me straight to hell is what I fear

It is love that caused the hellish nightmare
And life only comes with a one way fare

Love’s Reward, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

Love's RewardThe Raging Rapids, Peder Mork Mønsted (n.d.)

Love’s Reward

Ranging river flooded into my heart,
Suffocating, surely I will be drowned.
Its power so great to tear me apart,
Can this really be love that I found?

Kidnapped by aches and pains and nervous twitch,
Twisting and turning, can’t sleep in my bed.
Desire new feeling for which I may switch,
To rid me of this swirling in my head.

How I hunger but unable to eat,
Stomach tighter than a Gordian knot.
Shivering yet sweating from intense heat,
Visits to countless doctors are for naught.

If this be love, I know not what to do,
Should this be my reward for loving you?