Ashes, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

AshesAshes, Edvard Munch (1894)

Ashes

They are consumed by erotic passion
Tearing at the other like starved lions
Creating hotness greater than the sun
Becoming searing flames neither slackens

Like bellows desperately pumping air
Lungs enlarged to a point of explosion
Salty steam rising from the naked pair
Of their fleshy mass there is no fission

There’s no glow from their smoldering ashes
Not a single drop of desire remains
The needing feelings of love now ceases
Yet in the lovers’ hearts are darkened stains

Like others, they’re victims of nature’s game
Which does not provide for love eternal
Only a new generation to claim
Been true since Eve gave Adam the apple

Heart of Snow, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

Heart of SnowHeart of Snow, Edward Robert Hughes (1907)

Heart of Snow

Born to life as human from snow and ice
Of a mountain built on white purity
Never yielding to any mortal vice
That grows rampantly in any city

Here you are to be ever protected
You may as well been formed in simple brass
For how can your feelings be projected
When the high heat of desire comes to pass

Dire is your life for love you cannot feel
Your heart would rapidly turn to water
The moment you find your love is real
To this problem is there any answer

Created by man to place on the shelf
But in reality hurting them-self

Allegory of the Apple, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

Allegory of an appleStill Life with Apples, Paul Cezanne (c.1890)

Allegory of the Apple

Most perfect of her kind at the table
Beauty of such proportions I do mull
Resisting a bite unsure if able
My ravenous heartbeat there is no lull

Do dare to hold her softly in my hands
To move her towards my hungering lips
For such a sweet delight there were no plans
Reality of this must come to grips

All control have I admittedly lost
Knowing my thoughts are surely to anger
Must consume this beauty at any cost
Burning desire can no longer deter

Yes the sweet flawless apple I did eat
There will be penance for this tasteful treat

Sappho and Phaon, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

Sappho and PhaonSappho and Phaon, David Jacques-Louis (1809)

Sappho and Phaon

Sappho, such control of poetic words,
But thy heart runs unrestrained as a stag.
Surely did not follow songs of love birds
Phaon with great ease thy heart did he snag

Were thou charmed by Aphrodite’s gift to him?
A competitor of her Adonis.
Soon causing thou to feel more than a whim,
Phaon so willing to accept your muss.

Thou and he created a carnal fire.
He expressed an insatiable desire.
Of thy loving touch he early did tire.
Abandoned, alone now to play thy lyre.

Thy asking the fates this love to remove,
If not let thee drown. The fates did behoove.

“Annie” Richmond, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

Edgar Allan PoeEdgar Allan Poe, Oscar Halling (c. 1860)

“Annie” Richmond

If were to die with unfulfilled passion
What would happen to my beleaguered soul
To wander a dark wasteland so barren
My hurting story will remain untold

Nay I say with yet unknown breaths to take
It is my love that you have forsaken
In my heart you have placed a piercing stake
But not a love which will soon come undone

You enter my dreams cruelly each night
To take you completely is your command
Beauty so tasteful within my sight
I reach but it is not you in my hand

A curse to this day is over my head
Saying I love you cannot be unsaid

 

Broken Vows, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

Broken VowsBroken Vows, Philip Hermogenes Calderon (1856)

Broken Vows

Without seeing, feel love no longer true
His touch not now as it was at the start
Feeling grieving black, not bright sunny blue
The aching pain, crushing my bleeding heart

Needing to know, one day followed his path
Much laughter each enjoying the folly
Would it be correct to display my wrath
Thinking my character it would sully

Without showing anger called him a rake
Said that within me there remains a glow
Asked if what he’s doing be a mistake
His answer being that he did not know

Once felt we were one, now we are apart
Hoping to overcome a broken heart

 

Windflowers, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

WindflowersWindflowers, John William Waterhouse (1902)

Windflowers

Thou garner my flowers then dash away,
Thy beauty is much greater than their sum.
Alluring garden would be if thou stay,
Just remain ‘til thee be final blossom.

Sent the wind to touch your ivory skin.
Purer than that of newborn mother’s milk,
Protecting thy beauty which burns within.
Come stay awhile so I may touch thy silk.

Do sense a hesitation in thy pace,
Thy action causes heartbeat to increase.
Turn so I may see thy beautiful face,
This feeling of love for thee shall not cease.

Let me braid my flowers into thy hair,
And I shall give my heart to thee to wear.