Yes or No, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

Yes or NoYes or No, Edmund Blair Leighton (1890)

Yes or No

With a feeling bluer than my nosegay
Worrisome heart in doubt, life uncertain
Still not knowing what exactly to say
Is today to be the final curtain

He claims an undying love ever true
Is there a chance his love to go a stray
But he gave a feeling I never knew
Feeling continues till this very day

Is confusion of mind, love that I feel
Thought love to be much joy and happiness
Not an aching heart, a painful ordeal
Yet such warm comfort from his gentleness

Yes or no, somehow I must now decide
Shall it be goodbye or become his bride


Woman in My Life, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

Elizabeth_Jane_Gardner_-_After_the_engagement (c. 1882)
Elizabeth Jane Gardner, After the Engagement (c. 1882)

Woman in My Life, Robert A Sieczkiewicz

You’re the sunshine that greets me every day
Your soft smile puts one on my yawning face
Your eyes so bright a message they convey
Your lips many kisses on mine do place

Your first embrace steadies my wobbly feet
You are the sweetness in my morning cup
Your touch is the first I desire to meet
You are the one that makes my heart gallop

Your love gives to me such warming comfort
Your strength to pick me up when I am down
You give me special joy the way you flirt
You do all of this still in a nightgown

You are the one who truly made my life
Each morning I give thanks you are my wife


Richard and Elizabeth, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

Dicksee Margaret Isabel-Sheridan at the LinleysSheridan at the Linleys, Margaret Isabel Dicksee (1899)

Richard and Elizabeth, Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

This angelic voice I hear is so sweet
Her great beauty exceeding every note
Which my waiting ears are happy to meet
In my heart her beauty willing to tote

By the many suitors she is adored
But none could ever love her any more
Willingly save her honor with my sword
Provide her needed peace on foreign shore

A wounded song bird with such painful strife
Come under my wing, again you will sing
The wondrous joy when we be man and wife
Happiness into your life I will bring

A few bars more to the end of the score
Then you and I, our love we will explore



The Seamstress, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

Gisela Josef–The_Seamstress (1897)The Seamstress, Josef Gisela (1897)

The Seamstress, Robert A Sieczkiewicz

A seamstress fingers are made for action.
Parts she joins together to be just one.
The wedding dress she sews will soon be done.
But have feelings of the bride come undone?

Too young to understand what her life be,
Love glows now, but can change to misery.
So concerned with turning from me to we,
Then the need to extend family tree.

She asks, what does it take to be a bride?
Need to feel like a real wife inside,
To walk with husband, both in even stride,
Making sure any gap does not get wide.

Take each precious day, sew them together,
Being sure love withstands any weather.

Country Courtship, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

(c) Rushcliffe Borough Council; Supplied by The Public Catalogue FoundationCountry Courtship, Herbert Wilson Foster (1895)

Country Courtship, Robert A Sieczkiewicz

Within your tender heart is there some doubt,
Of your love of me or my love of you?
A yearning love for you there is no drought,
The fire you lit runs in me through and through.

My hand I put forward asking for yours.
Your choice made be free as these great outdoors.
Knowing that you can open many doors,
Pray hands be joined under the sycamores.

Don’t know what to us the future may bring,
But each day my love of you shall I sing,
Every morning shall be another spring,
If you decide to wear my wedding ring.

In this life I have but one aching fear,
That your two hearts unable to be near.

The Day After, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

Munch Edvard-The Day After (c1895)The Day After, Edvard Munch (c. 1895)

The Day After, Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

Here am I laying idle on my bed,
Wond’r what is going on inside my head.
Should be up doing things I always dread.
Will lazily linger awhile instead.

Having real trouble with what I’ve read.
Extremely troubling thoughts it did embed.
Thinking that down the wrong path I am led.
Somehow very soon these thoughts I must shed.

Not logical for myself to behead.
Now I hold tightly to a single thread.
Is it true, to a fool I soon be wed?
Am I the fool listening to what is said?

Dangerous to heed the gossip they spread,
All of this talk has made my face blood-red.




Sweet Idleness, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

Toulmouche Auguste-Dolce far niente (1877)

Auguste Toulmouche, Dolce far niente (1877)


Sweet Idleness, Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

Sweet idleness helps to improve my mind.
To read of others in their endeavor,
Of love, seeking two hearts to be entwined.
While I’m safe without fear of displeasure.

Tales of woe often fall on my deaf ears,
Of the flagrant straying of a lover.
None to date has yet to bring me to tears.
A small smile as my heart does not suffer.

Am I the fool for keeping my heart closed?
To having lived the feeling of heartache?
To live with tragedy with heart exposed?
To be captured by an ev’r charming rake?

None do I find the least bit amusing,
Nor the thought of me, a love pursuing.