The Day After, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

Munch Edvard-The Day After (c1895)The Day After, Edvard Munch (c. 1895)

The Day After, Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

Here am I laying idle on my bed,
Wond’r what is going on inside my head.
Should be up doing things I always dread.
Will lazily linger awhile instead.

Having real trouble with what I’ve read.
Extremely troubling thoughts it did embed.
Thinking that down the wrong path I am led.
Somehow very soon these thoughts I must shed.

Not logical for myself to behead.
Now I hold tightly to a single thread.
Is it true, to a fool I soon be wed?
Am I the fool listening to what is said?

Dangerous to heed the gossip they spread,
All of this talk has made my face blood-red.

 

 

 

Sweet Idleness, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

Toulmouche Auguste-Dolce far niente (1877)

Auguste Toulmouche, Dolce far niente (1877)

 

Sweet Idleness, Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

Sweet idleness helps to improve my mind.
To read of others in their endeavor,
Of love, seeking two hearts to be entwined.
While I’m safe without fear of displeasure.

Tales of woe often fall on my deaf ears,
Of the flagrant straying of a lover.
None to date has yet to bring me to tears.
A small smile as my heart does not suffer.

Am I the fool for keeping my heart closed?
To having lived the feeling of heartache?
To live with tragedy with heart exposed?
To be captured by an ev’r charming rake?

None do I find the least bit amusing,
Nor the thought of me, a love pursuing.

In the Conservatory, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

z-Manet Edouard-Dans-la-Serre

Edouard Manet, Dans la Serre (1879)

 

In the Conservatory, Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

In his heart shall I drive my parasol?
His bourgeois attitude is so arcane,
No longer will I be within his thrall,
I have the tools, his desires to restrain.

Our golden wedding bands are now empty,
Sign of a union now they are apart.
I’m more than happy to accept his plea,
To start to rekindle my hardened heart.

You remain the only man in my life,
Not looking to be another’s chattel.
I desire to be your partner, your wife,
To let my heart be your only castle.

You should avoid title interloper,
And to return to being my lover.

 

 

The Love Song, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

Burne-Jones Edward-The Love Song (1878)

Edward Brune-Jones, The Love Song (1878)

 

The Love Song, Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

In the bower at twilight listening:
Listening to songs of your great beauty.
I close my eyes and do see you singing,
The music, don’t stop is my anxious plea.

Sing to me my beautiful nightingale,
Sing the words of our love that touch my heart,
Those which bring me to my knees ever frail.
Though we are apart your songs do impart.

Soon together again, to hear your voice,
My adoring eyes shall be opened wide,
Being rapturous that I was your choice,
And that forever you shall be my bride.

May we never again asunder be.
If to be, your love song will comfort me.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Couple at Tea, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

z-couple at the table

Couple at Tea, Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

Be not a better way to make amend,
As I not with knowledge of infraction.
If it was I that to thee did offend,
Pray tell, as there will be rapid action.

Please smile for life so still is very vile,
Come close provide the magic of thy touch.
Show both thy eyes not a chilling profile,
Open thy heart for I not be nonesuch.

Thy displeasure has cut my heart so deep,
For it is to thee I have pledged my life.
Need to find a resolve before we sleep,
As it is love that made us man and wife.

Our union is one for eternity,
No matter the moment of anger be.

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Painting by: Gotthardt Johann Kuehl, Paar am Teetisch (c. 1900)