Waiting to See, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

Hemy Charles Napiery-Waiting (1895)Charles Napier Hemy, Waiting (1895)

Waiting to See, Robert A Sieczkiewicz

Stretching the eye as far as it could watch,
Where the sea and the sky meld into none,
And all to be seen is a mere gray blotch,
Then comes the end of the earth; it is gone.

Waiting, impossible for heart to task,
Still there is demanding work to be done.
Smile to be worn is but a flimsy mask,
Fearful of the solemn bell to beckon.

The shadows run long, time to be ready.
Six days a week this is the constant drill.
Shortly to learn, the nerves must be steady,
For it is now we are told of God’s will.

Stress has left my chest with the boat in sight,
Though the sun will soon set my heart is bright.

 

Winters Past, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

z-Winterliche Landschaft mit zugefrorenem Altwasser und FigurenstaffageWintry Landscape with Frozen Water and Figure Statues, Johann Jungblut (c. 1900)

Winters Past, Robert A Sieczkiewicz

The glittering glow of winter’s first snow,
It is that time of year of so much cheer,
When Jack Frost puts on his seasonal show,
A time when we wish our love ones be near.

Is not a time to bundle up and hide.
Lights in each window to beckon with bliss.
Come in and sit awhile by the fireside,
Search for the mistletoe to get a kiss.

Turkey and toys, memories full of joy,
Sledding and skating for all of the day.
This is what I remember as a boy,
Now I see it in a different way.

Stress from hunger and pain are in full view.
Was it the same then I just never knew?

Golden Autumn, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

 

Isaac_Levitan_-_Golden_autumn._Slobodka_-_Google_Art_ProjectGolden Autumn, Slobodka, Isaac Levitan (1889)

Golden Autumn, Robert A Sieczkiewicz

Here I sit on the hill silent and still,
Peering off to the end with mind spawning.
Autumn, the soft wind gives its gentle chill,
Time not move this day for this I’m yearning.

Relive this year impossible I fear,
Yet many memories forever be.
No doubt this has been a wonderful year,
Having those I love so much, near to me.

The darkness of winter shall soon be here,
With many memories shant shed a tear.
Plentiful laughs and giggles fill my ear,
Held so close to my heart with much revere.

In autumn some work to collect the leaves,
For me it is time to store memories.

Late Afternoon, New York Winter, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

Hassam Frederick_Childe--Late_AfternoonFrederick Childe Hassam, Late Afternoon, New York Winter (1900)

Late Afternoon, New York Winter,  Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

The frozen aimless dust of pearly white,
Stings my naked face then quickly vanished.
Straining, squinting; trying to keep my sight.
My skin shines as if it has been varnished.

My numb dew-beaters now no longer known,
Departed somewhere near Twentieth Street.
Now these cat-sticks of mine begin to moan.
What I’d willingly give to feel some heat!

Those who think this is a beautiful sight,
Are under cover; each in their taxi,
With no compassion for my nasty plight.
For me this winter night there’ll be no glee!

Pray tell, when will the crocus start to grow?
Not soon enough to get rid of this snow!

 

 

Lovers Consumed by the Sea, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

Moran Thomas, Moonlight Seascaape (1892)Moonlight Seascape, Thomas Moran (1892)

Lovers Consumed by the Sea, Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

Amphitrite at the shore outward gazing.
Neptune moved stealthily and kissed her feet.
His touch of her so exhilarating,
She staring down sending a smile so sweet.

Music from the waves kept her in a trance,
Moves her body as if doing a dance.
No longer now giving the sea a glance,
Then came roaring a wave of great expanse.

Sea now became still so quiet it be,
Amphitrite now has returned to the sea.
Consumed for love by Neptune’s own decree,
As he was by the goddess’s own beauty.

The hypnotic sea with powering might,
Continues to draw lovers every night.

 

 

 

 

More Friend than Foe, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

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Wheat Fields, Jacob van Ruisdael (c. 1670)

 

More Friend than Foe, Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

Looking out to the sky you caught my eye,
Ominous for sure, you’re not at all shy.
Not the least caring if I live or die,
A very dangerous craft you do ply.

Be it your desire you can start a fire,
At the moment next cause it to expire.
Or in a single flash devour any spire,
And I for one will not provoke your ire.

All rather feel the gentler side of you.
You helping with our gardens to renew,
Not much caring if it be impromptu,
And pray your help will always continue.

Angering clouds can be distasteful pain,
But to wish departure would be insane.

 

 

Romantic Landscape, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

Duncanson Robert- Romantic Landscape

Romantic Landscape, Robert Duncanson (c. 1860)

Romantic Landscape, Robert A Sieczkiewicz

Walking slowly in a familiar place,
The softness of green was nary a trace.
All around me flew at a hurried pace.
Unable to find a familiar face.

The hazy sky above was but a slice.
Gray tall buildings on each side made a vise.
Windows all brimming trying to entice.
Be assured this is not my paradise.

My soul hungers for a place more pleasing,
A land where clear water brooks are babbling,
Hills of lush green grass forever rolling,
And the big blue sky is never hiding.

In this tarred world is more than meets the eye,
Soon without sadness be saying goodbye.