Experimenting with the poem form Triolet.

A triolet is almost always a stanza poem of eight lines, though stanzas with as few as seven lines and as many as nine or more have appeared in its history. Its rhyme scheme is ABaAabAB (capital letters represent lines repeated verbatim) and in 19th century English triolets often all lines are in iambic tetrameter, though in traditional French triolets from the 17th century on the second, sixth and eighth lines tend to be iambic trimeters followed by one amphibrachic foot each. In French terminology, a line ending in an iambic foot was denoted as masculine, while a line ending in an amphibrachic foot was called feminine. Depending on the language and era, other meters are seen, even in French. The first, fourth and seventh lines are identical, as are the second and final lines, thereby making the initial and final couplets identical as well. In a traditional French triolet, the second and third non-repeating lines rhyme with the repeating first, fourth, and seventh lines, while the non-repeating sixth line rhymes with the second and eighth repeating lines. However, especially in German triolets of the 18th and 19th centuries, one will see this pattern often violated.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Triolet

For me writing the three triolets below was like working out a rubix cube. Moving words around so they fit. However, I did find a high level of enjoyment in writing them. Always up for a challenge. It would be appreciated if comments were offered.

Sunset
Oh my love, touch me where you may
Make this night one not to forget
Say words that I need you to say
Oh my love, touch me where you may.
With you forever I will stay
To lie with you at each sunset
Oh my love, touch me where you may
Make this night one not to forget

Wink of an Eye
In just a mere wink of an eye
Your world can permanently change
A single hello or goodbye
In just a mere wink of an eye
Its impact you cannot deny
Impossible to rearrange
In just a mere wink of an eye
Your world can permanently change

That Special Kiss
Will remember that special kiss
I parted your lips with my tongue
The key to a heavenly bliss
Will remember that special kiss
A feeling never to dismiss
In my heart a love song was sung
Will remember that special kiss
I parted your lips with my tongue

Sunset over the Sea, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

Sun Setting on the ShoreSunset over the Sea, William Pye (1900)

Sunset over the Sea, Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

Dusk adds fine colors to sky of summer
Ferocious white capped waves bring on a chill
A setting sun removes ocean’s glimmer
Near water’s edge they place firewood with skill

With deftness of hand there soon will be heat
For they had done this countless times before
This night is strange, cannot accept defeat
Is this not the place they had called their shore

Maybe a new way was necessary
They restack the wood a different way
Flame was weak making them rather wary
Without affront a wave took all away

Motionlessly starring at each other
Each walked away without any anger

 

Violets, Sweet Violets, a poem by Robert Sieczkiewicz

Violets Sweet Violets

Violets, Sweet Violets, John William Godward (1908)

Violets, Sweet Violets, Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

Violets, sweet violets thee I hold
You say my lover ever to be true
An omen of truth before days of old
Yet I be blue, a blue darker than you

From me there shall be no dowry given
Material wealth passed family by
How true can it be his heart I have won
Violets, sweet violets tell me why

Breathing in your spoken heavenly scent
My yearning heart floats like the summer wind
Dreaming of the love message you have sent
Violets, sweet violets love did find

Deep love shall break traditions of the past
Violets, sweet violets love will last

 

Twilight and Day, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

Twilight and DayPortraits of Lorna and Dorothy Bell, Sir James Jebusa Shannon (c. 1904)

Twilight and Day, Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

Tender message of light does Twilight bring
Providing help lifting the sleeping fog
Gently coaxing the morning birds to sing
Rousting me up for I sleep as a log

Twilight you are a joy but must make way
Sun now of full view in the eastern sky
A bright sign welcoming your sister Day
Those colors of beauty she’ll amplify

Day is your brightness that helps flowers grow
Providing light for me to get things done
In the winter to melt ice and snow
Day you now end just as you had begun

The sun falls in the west yielding to Night
A silent time to put thoughts in order
For hours I shall rest waiting for Twilight
Until she touches my eyes shall not stir

 

Dreams, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

DreamsFlaming June, Frederic Leighton (1895)

Dreams

The sun has risen but dream as you may
Leave labors of work for another day
Hope your dreams be filled with the thoughts of me
As the many nights my dreams be of you
Praying that all my dreams may soon come true
That you may know my love forever be

Affixed by your beauty am much beguiled
Cuddled as a kitten or little child
But the facts bear that you are a woman
Whose tender touch shall eagerly await
Knowing this desire for you shant abate
Hoping my love you are never to shun

 

The Breakfast, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

The BreakfastThe Breakfast, Edward McGregor Paxton (1911)

The Breakfast

That paper might as well a brick wall be
Our hearts are now so distantly apart
This small table like the world’s largest sea
Not sure that a path exists to his heart

Now I share a bed with a lump of coal
Moving close to create some body heat
His response is the other side to roll
I am left with only my two cold feet

So willing to offer myself to him
To show that I remain his eager wife
But appears that chances are mighty slim
There will be melting passion in our life

Our lives now not as was our wedding night
Only with the light on is my night bright