The Confession, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

Dicksee-The ConfessionThe Confession, Frank Dicksee (1898)

The Confession, Robert A Sieczkiewicz

Oh how I anguish over love of thee
I fear can’t see thou any other way
When I see thee am I to quickly flee
No my heart with thee will forever stay

Can I coral thee to a gathering arm
Turning and offering a cheek to kiss
To think our touching is doing no harm
Believing such I’d surely be remiss

There’s an aching desire with thee to lay
To have our wanton flesh meld into one
Doing all proving not a game I play
Then fearing penalty for what I’ve done

Am I the fool thinking a love to be
Or will it take Moses to part the sea

 

Woman in My Life, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

Elizabeth_Jane_Gardner_-_After_the_engagement (c. 1882)
Elizabeth Jane Gardner, After the Engagement (c. 1882)

Woman in My Life, Robert A Sieczkiewicz

You’re the sunshine that greets me every day
Your soft smile puts one on my yawning face
Your eyes so bright a message they convey
Your lips many kisses on mine do place

Your first embrace steadies my wobbly feet
You are the sweetness in my morning cup
Your touch is the first I desire to meet
You are the one that makes my heart gallop

Your love gives to me such warming comfort
Your strength to pick me up when I am down
You give me special joy the way you flirt
You do all of this still in a nightgown

You are the one who truly made my life
Each morning I give thanks you are my wife

 

Lady in a Boat, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

Albert_Edelfelt_-_Lady in a boat (1886)Albert Edelfelt, Lady in a boat (1886)

Lady in a Boat

Nary a sound, air remains deathly still
Here I am with varying thoughts afloat
Not sure if I am here against my will
Without knowing be this a tomb or boat

Not tethered any way to nearby shore
Drifting aimlessly to I don’t know where
Is obvious that I have not an oar
But yet not willing to claim my despair

Were I to scream is there anyone near
Then comes darkness without having a light
Skin is damp a sign of impending fear
Wondering if this be my final night

As if by lightning was struck by a whim
My clothes and I parted went for a swim

 

Pygmalion and Galatea, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

z-Jean Leon GeromePygmalion and GalateaJean Leon Gerome, Pygmalion and Galatea (1890)

Pygmalion and Galatea

Marble before him was without error
Hammer and chisel moved with affection
Carefully attending the stone’s cipher
Soon to be his woman of perfection

Pygmalion prayed to Aphrodite
His desire was not for golden treasure
Gave overt sign she heard his earnest plea
He soon felt a sense of warming pleasure

Embracing his statute its warmth he felt
Confused wondering if could be real
Touching her satin skin he quickly knelt
Before him stood a majestic angel

Praised Aphrodite for changing his life
Pygmalion happy with his new wife

 

Richard and Elizabeth, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

Dicksee Margaret Isabel-Sheridan at the LinleysSheridan at the Linleys, Margaret Isabel Dicksee (1899)

Richard and Elizabeth, Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

This angelic voice I hear is so sweet
Her great beauty exceeding every note
Which my waiting ears are happy to meet
In my heart her beauty willing to tote

By the many suitors she is adored
But none could ever love her any more
Willingly save her honor with my sword
Provide her needed peace on foreign shore

A wounded song bird with such painful strife
Come under my wing, again you will sing
The wondrous joy when we be man and wife
Happiness into your life I will bring

A few bars more to the end of the score
Then you and I, our love we will explore

 

 

The Shell, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

Bouguereau Adolphe-Willem_Bouguereau_-_The_ShellAdolphe-Willem Bouguereau – The Shell (not dated)

The Shell, Robert A Sieczkiewicz

Put the shell to your ear, what do you hear?
Do you hear a rolling roar, is it clear?
Is it a big singing sea, is it near?
As if we were standing upon the pier?

There is more of a story to that roar.
Long ago when mariners first left their shore,
Seeking many treasures and fighting war,
But in their greed they wanted even more.

Wished to make a slave of the mighty sea.
In arms to seize Sirenum scopuli.
All the Sirens gagged were tied to a tree,
Nevermore their voices to be set free.

This sent Neptune into a royal rage.
He called for Gastropods of any age,
Their help to this vicious act to upstage.
With the mariners war he would engage.

In each he blew a magical sounding.
To mariners it would be resounding,
So powerful it was hypnotizing,
Doing deeds without ever surmising.

Gastropods cast their shells to the high tide
Naked they were they went elsewhere to hide
At low tide the mariners did abide
An ear to each shell now ready to ride

In their boats again to complete a task,
Under rigid trance not needing to ask.
Relieve each of the Sirens from her mask,
Thus each now able to the shore to bask.

Millenniums have passed since that event.
Mariners don’t remember being sent.
Never required by Neptune to repent,
But he shall never forget its portent.

The shells now have lost most of their power,
But like flowers in the rolling bower,
Many hearts they do easily capture,
Putting minds into a state of rapture.

 

Wind of Love, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

Gustave Courbet - The Calm Sea [1869]Gustave Courbet – The Calm Sea (1869)

Wind of Love

Come fly with me, give me your caring hand.
We grab the wind which is at our command,
To take us wherever we shall demand,
Be it over blue sea or verdant land.

Life is beautiful when with one you love,
To share our many moments together.
Being lovingly close as hand in glove,
Tightly embrace whatever the weather.

Today wind sets us at sandy white beach,
With music of birds filling the clear air.
No doubt of love for each other we reach,
Lips meeting, symbol of love we declare.

May our special wind be ever gentle,
Taking us to places so beautiful.