Clandestine Affair, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

Dahl Johan_Christian_Claussen_Dahl_-_En_sky_og_landskap_studie_av_måneskinn (1822)Johann Christian Dahl, A Cloud and Landscape Study by Moonlight (1822)

Clandestine Affair, Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

Above their heads the moon offered a smirk.
The fall wind an ugly message did send.
Assured are they in their clandestine work,
Sliding closer and closer at each bend.

The language of love both very fluent.
As the solid oak door was opened wide,
Coats carelessly flung off in an instant.
Now for magical moments here inside.

Fireplace and they were about to compete.
Her head tossed back caught the glorious light,
Here on in actions will be indiscreet.
Thank heaven for this libidinous night.

In their completeness they sat by the fire,
After having consumed all their desire.

 

Lovers Consumed by the Sea, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

Moran Thomas, Moonlight Seascaape (1892)Moonlight Seascape, Thomas Moran (1892)

Lovers Consumed by the Sea, Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

Amphitrite at the shore outward gazing.
Neptune moved stealthily and kissed her feet.
His touch of her so exhilarating,
She staring down sending a smile so sweet.

Music from the waves kept her in a trance,
Moves her body as if doing a dance.
No longer now giving the sea a glance,
Then came roaring a wave of great expanse.

Sea now became still so quiet it be,
Amphitrite now has returned to the sea.
Consumed for love by Neptune’s own decree,
As he was by the goddess’s own beauty.

The hypnotic sea with powering might,
Continues to draw lovers every night.

 

 

 

 

Muse or Odalisque, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

Courbet Gustave -Jo the Beautiful Irish Girl (1866)

Jo, the Beautiful Irish Girl,  Gustave Courbet (1866)

 

Muse or Odalisque, Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

The mirror shows the color of my hair,
But silent on my internal despair.
O but wishing this piece of glass could care,
As my quandary has been a nightmare.

With two so distinct can my love I share?
What I ask is it a request so rare?
Understanding it be an odd affair,
Yet to cast aside one would be unfair.

To make a choice of one my heart I’d tear.
A love of both no issues to declare.
Am able to withstand the wretched stare.
When Whistler or Courbet call I’ll be there.

Such arrangements are not so very quare.
Is it novel to have wife and affair?

 

 

 

Romantic Landscape, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

Duncanson Robert- Romantic Landscape

Romantic Landscape, Robert Duncanson (c. 1860)

Romantic Landscape, Robert A Sieczkiewicz

Walking slowly in a familiar place,
The softness of green was nary a trace.
All around me flew at a hurried pace.
Unable to find a familiar face.

The hazy sky above was but a slice.
Gray tall buildings on each side made a vise.
Windows all brimming trying to entice.
Be assured this is not my paradise.

My soul hungers for a place more pleasing,
A land where clear water brooks are babbling,
Hills of lush green grass forever rolling,
And the big blue sky is never hiding.

In this tarred world is more than meets the eye,
Soon without sadness be saying goodbye.

The Day After, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

Munch Edvard-The Day After (c1895)The Day After, Edvard Munch (c. 1895)

The Day After, Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

Here am I laying idle on my bed,
Wond’r what is going on inside my head.
Should be up doing things I always dread.
Will lazily linger awhile instead.

Having real trouble with what I’ve read.
Extremely troubling thoughts it did embed.
Thinking that down the wrong path I am led.
Somehow very soon these thoughts I must shed.

Not logical for myself to behead.
Now I hold tightly to a single thread.
Is it true, to a fool I soon be wed?
Am I the fool listening to what is said?

Dangerous to heed the gossip they spread,
All of this talk has made my face blood-red.

 

 

 

Lovers’ Moon, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

z-Unknown Artist - Lovers, c.1910

Unknown Artist, Lovers (c. 1910)

Lovers’ Moon, Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

So close to Cupid, fear we’re his target.
Come we shall take the staircase to heaven.
There memories made never to forget.
Lovers’ moon so bright will be our beacon.

If you be chilled, here take my loving heart,
Aflame of a resplendent love of you.
As you have neutralized every rampart,
Eagerly awaits your love to imbue.

Ask me not why I feel the way I do,
Very first sight of you love would ensue.
Such a feeling will always continue,
Admitting my love never to eschew.

Though tonight’s lovers’ moon is soon to set,
Its light on you face thoughts of when we met.

The Muse, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

z-Romney George-Lady_Hamilton_as_CirceGeorge Romney, Lady Hamilton as Circe (c. 1872)

The Muse, Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

Starring unfocused at empty paper.
If I be less than a scared cuttlefish,
Squirting ink into the unsafe water.
With absent thoughts ready to relinquish.

Magical words to sweep thee off thy feet,
Nowhere in my mindful search were they found.
Unfit of thy love to admit defeat.
Gridlocked mind must be hurriedly unbound.

Closed eyes thou stand vividly before me,
Beauty beyond that which graced to Circe.
To free this mind gladly pay the bounty,
But the cost is lost memory of thee.

This conundrum I am forever doomed,
A taste of thy love nev’r to be consumed.