Daphnis and Chloe, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

The Storm, Pierre Auguste Cot (1880)
The Storm, Pierre Auguste Cot (1880)

Daphnis and Chloe

Dropped in a distant place, a twist of fate,
Each child not knowing one from the other.
In the years an affection did create,
Soon desire each other for a lover.

Bright sun rays pressed against their naked skin,
Unversed in their current heated moment.
Swelling inside they held immense desire,
Yet to meet dares to their love involvement.

Lightening split the darkened autumn sky,
With hurry a torrent of arrows fell.
Would all the gods this tender love deny.
Or they a different ending foretell?

Love as theirs is not easy to destroy,
Before long they were joined in loving joy.

The Storm, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

The StormThe Waterspout, Gustave Courbet (1870)

The Storm

O that rain which comes in the darkest night
Shaking angrily my bedroom window
With its booming thunder and scaring light

Even glass within is showing some fright
A minor crack now beginning to show
O that rain which comes in the darkest night

Feeling that it rattles me just for spite
Tries to make within a horrific woe
With its booming thunder and scaring light

Bring my poor heart beat to a deathly height
Driving rain delivers its mighty blow
O that rain which comes in the darkest night

Makes my knuckles turn a ghastly pale white
Wondering what damages will it sow
With its booming thunder and scaring light

Now I’m waiting for the sun to shine bright
To spare me from this dark night’s awful glow
O that rain which comes in the darkest night
With its booming thunder and scaring light