Tag Archives: Triolet

Her Hand, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

Her Hand

Her hot hand slid across my thigh
While fingers did a spider’s crawl
My breath reached a dangerous high

Her hot hand slid across my thigh
She’s on a mission can’t deny
Like an angler begins to trawl

Her hot hand slid across my thigh
While fingers did a spider’s crawl

Image credit:

https://www.newsbreak.com/news/0OIWGzbs/dear-therapist-my-wifes-sister-came-on-to-me

Special note:

Tomorrow I will post a second version of the single idea. Please read both and comment. Select the one you prefer and it is your choice. Until tomorrow

Searching, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

Beneath the leaves, spring is preparing

Searching

Rifling through the darkened brown leaves
Looking for the colors of spring,
Seeking comfort from winter’s eves.


Rifling through the darkened brown leaves
Wanting what’s below them relieves,
That which makes my lonely heart sing.


Rifling through the darkened brown leaves
Looking for the colors of spring.

Magic, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

Edvard Munch, Two Human Beings. The Lonely Ones (1905)

Magic

There’s such a magical moment
When you’re ever close by my side
But sad when you’re at a distant
There’s such a magical moment
To feel your kisses so potent
Giving feelings that I can’t hide
There’s such a magical moment
When you’re ever close by my side

Experimenting with the poem form Triolet.

A triolet is almost always a stanza poem of eight lines, though stanzas with as few as seven lines and as many as nine or more have appeared in its history. Its rhyme scheme is ABaAabAB (capital letters represent lines repeated verbatim) and in 19th century English triolets often all lines are in iambic tetrameter, though in traditional French triolets from the 17th century on the second, sixth and eighth lines tend to be iambic trimeters followed by one amphibrachic foot each. In French terminology, a line ending in an iambic foot was denoted as masculine, while a line ending in an amphibrachic foot was called feminine. Depending on the language and era, other meters are seen, even in French. The first, fourth and seventh lines are identical, as are the second and final lines, thereby making the initial and final couplets identical as well. In a traditional French triolet, the second and third non-repeating lines rhyme with the repeating first, fourth, and seventh lines, while the non-repeating sixth line rhymes with the second and eighth repeating lines. However, especially in German triolets of the 18th and 19th centuries, one will see this pattern often violated.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Triolet

For me writing the three triolets below was like working out a rubix cube. Moving words around so they fit. However, I did find a high level of enjoyment in writing them. Always up for a challenge. It would be appreciated if comments were offered.

Sunset
Oh my love, touch me where you may
Make this night one not to forget
Say words that I need you to say
Oh my love, touch me where you may.
With you forever I will stay
To lie with you at each sunset
Oh my love, touch me where you may
Make this night one not to forget

Wink of an Eye
In just a mere wink of an eye
Your world can permanently change
A single hello or goodbye
In just a mere wink of an eye
Its impact you cannot deny
Impossible to rearrange
In just a mere wink of an eye
Your world can permanently change

That Special Kiss
Will remember that special kiss
I parted your lips with my tongue
The key to a heavenly bliss
Will remember that special kiss
A feeling never to dismiss
In my heart a love song was sung
Will remember that special kiss
I parted your lips with my tongue