Sisters, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

SistersThe Letter, John Morgan (1875)

Sisters

Mutual sperm and eggs created both
Though we are different as if untrue
Yet early on we took important oath
To be joined by something stronger than glue

We are only parted by varied age
Becoming less important as we grew
No longer see my sister as a sage
Now borrowing when she buys clothing new

There are many times when oath became weak
Especially when eyes fell on same male
For periods of time havoc would wreak
In the end friendship would always prevail

In just a day my best friend shall marry
Yet loving sisters we’ll forever be

 

Yes or No, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

Yes or NoYes or No, Edmund Blair Leighton (1890)

Yes or No

With a feeling bluer than my nosegay
Worrisome heart in doubt, life uncertain
Still not knowing what exactly to say
Is today to be the final curtain

He claims an undying love ever true
Is there a chance his love to go a stray
But he gave a feeling I never knew
Feeling continues till this very day

Is confusion of mind, love that I feel
Thought love to be much joy and happiness
Not an aching heart, a painful ordeal
Yet such warm comfort from his gentleness

Yes or no, somehow I must now decide
Shall it be goodbye or become his bride

 

Glass Door, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

windowImage manipulated by author

Glass Door

With bucket of water, squeegee and rag,
Performing menial chore I abhor.
For it will always make my spirits sag,
Daily cleaning of the stately glass door.

Fully covered with finger prints galore.
Strange as it be that it has no push bar,
Makes me hate this nasty door even more.
Without a key lock makes it more bizarre.

Limitless numbers who come but can’t pass.
Is this door’s only purpose to harass?
Or clearly an obstruction made of glass,
To ensure creation of an impasse?

Now clearly understanding took an axe,
Gave the mighty wall of glass forty whacks.

 

 

 

 

The Seamstress, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

Gisela Josef–The_Seamstress (1897)The Seamstress, Josef Gisela (1897)

The Seamstress, Robert A Sieczkiewicz

A seamstress fingers are made for action.
Parts she joins together to be just one.
The wedding dress she sews will soon be done.
But have feelings of the bride come undone?

Too young to understand what her life be,
Love glows now, but can change to misery.
So concerned with turning from me to we,
Then the need to extend family tree.

She asks, what does it take to be a bride?
Need to feel like a real wife inside,
To walk with husband, both in even stride,
Making sure any gap does not get wide.

Take each precious day, sew them together,
Being sure love withstands any weather.

Country Courtship, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

(c) Rushcliffe Borough Council; Supplied by The Public Catalogue FoundationCountry Courtship, Herbert Wilson Foster (1895)

Country Courtship, Robert A Sieczkiewicz

Within your tender heart is there some doubt,
Of your love of me or my love of you?
A yearning love for you there is no drought,
The fire you lit runs in me through and through.

My hand I put forward asking for yours.
Your choice made be free as these great outdoors.
Knowing that you can open many doors,
Pray hands be joined under the sycamores.

Don’t know what to us the future may bring,
But each day my love of you shall I sing,
Every morning shall be another spring,
If you decide to wear my wedding ring.

In this life I have but one aching fear,
That your two hearts unable to be near.

The Day After, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

Munch Edvard-The Day After (c1895)The Day After, Edvard Munch (c. 1895)

The Day After, Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

Here am I laying idle on my bed,
Wond’r what is going on inside my head.
Should be up doing things I always dread.
Will lazily linger awhile instead.

Having real trouble with what I’ve read.
Extremely troubling thoughts it did embed.
Thinking that down the wrong path I am led.
Somehow very soon these thoughts I must shed.

Not logical for myself to behead.
Now I hold tightly to a single thread.
Is it true, to a fool I soon be wed?
Am I the fool listening to what is said?

Dangerous to heed the gossip they spread,
All of this talk has made my face blood-red.

 

 

 

Wedding Night, a poem by Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

Carolus-Duran,_1868_-_Le_baiser

Carolus-Duran, The Kiss (1868)

Wedding Night, Robert A. Sieczkiewicz

My aching heart quivers when you are near,
Feelings euphoric of such I nev’r knew.
There is a great passion for you. I fear
My love ev’r present is only for you.

Your lips of red velvet I ache to kiss.
That touch, electricity do I feel,
Sending me into a frenzy of bliss.
Undeniable, this heart you did steal.

Kiss me deep to touch my heart, kiss me strong,
For in your heart I forever belong.
Kiss me sweet as sweet can be, kiss me long,
so I can feel the tend’r touch of our song.

No sensation greater except for one,
To be felt b’fore this night of love is done.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Carolus-Duran did this self-portrait to celebrate his new marriage so I thought it fitting to write a poem about their fist night as husband and wife.